Makers

Awabi ware

Ceramics

I'm an artist and potter based on Awaji-island hometown, near Kobe, Japan.

In 2012 I launched my pottery brand “Awabi ware” based on the concept of it being “house ware to inherit.” I produce items for daily use. And I pursue designs that will allow you to use them for your lifetime and longer.

I received my Master's degree in sculpture from Musashino Art University in Tokyo. Since 2010, I've been back in my island home, where I direct an art space named the "Awaji Art University." There my wife and I run various events and exhibitions for kids and adults, centered around the environment, agriculture and food through art and Awaji’s rich local resources.
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Chikako Kuwata

Ceramics

In running a studio, we aim to provide an idea of lifestyle in which people choose and use vessels, at various scenes of home life, in a way they choose their clothes. Daily dining tables do not consist of glassware alone. We wish glass tableware would be chosen and used with joy along with various tableware and cutlery of ceramics, porcelain, lacquer ware, metalwork and woodwork. We would like to make proposals that only We can make, such as making suggestion and help for our customers’ tableware selection.
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Fumika Miyake

Ceramicware

I make usually producing tableware of the errands mainly, and sometime make a vase or the art object. I often get the hint of form and patterns from a thing of nature.
I think, the items which I enjoyed when I create will make the people happy when they use it.
I graduated from Okayama University, Faculty of Education in 1994. In 2000, I established the my studio “Yu-labo” with Wakako Senda at Okayama city. “Yu” means a glaze, fun, and friends, “labo” means a laboratory.
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Hitoshi Morimoto

Ceramicware

I am a potter from a place called Bizen in Okayama Prefecture. Bizen is part of an ancient pottery tradition in Japan. What I always try to keep in mind is what sort of creation I should be making in the present while still tracing the great marks of my predecessors. For me, the start of the creative process begins with my search for “genuine thing,” that is, creating something that gives depth to daily lives and joy to those who use it.
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Koji Kitaoka

Ceramicware

After graduating from university in Tokyo, I moved to London and lived there for two years. There, I worked at a local restaurant while studying at a language school. Moving back to Tokyo and experiencing several types of jobs, I started to think that I wanted to make something that keeps will keep me ambitious and inquisitive. I also realized I was good at creative work. Then pottery, which was my father's profession, came to my mind and I thought I would give it a try.
From 2007, I studied at Arita College of Ceramics for two years. After graduation, I worked at a pottery studio in Toki, Gifu for a year.
In 2010, I moved back to Fukuoka, my hometown, to work at my father’s studio and got established. My studio is in an environment of small forests, about 10 kilometers from the center of Fukuoka city.
I try to create pieces with my own hands, which are simple and bear a tranquil presence. I hope that they are used often by as many people as possible.
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Mineko Nishimura

Ceramicware

Tea time is when one can take a breather over a cup of tea in the middle of busy days. A cup of tea can make you feel better even when you are exhausted. I think tea time has such a gentle power. And I am trying to create tea vessels with soft atmosphere that would fit to such moments.
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Takashi Sogo

Ceramicware

I make pottery at my studio and house on a hill overlooking the Inland Sea, living with my family. My workplace and residence are in the same location.
Vessels I create are for daily use. Vessels for daily use exist vividly only by being used to their full extent. I produce standard items constantly so that my customers may use them daily without any sense of hesitation. For my personal exhibitions, I create the special, one and only piece.
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Takaaki Yoshida

Ceramicware

My motto in making pottery is “Better being rough and ready than slow and elaborate” which are words by Sun Tzu from “The Art of War.” It means that work that is a bit rough but takes less time to complete is better than elaborate perfection that takes time. I think the pottery and antiques that I adore bear the beauty of “rough and ready.” The Joseon ceramics, old Karatsu and early Imari pottery have the beauty of “rough and ready” in their shapes and paintings. Exquisite and elaborate vessels are beautiful, but I find them suffocating and am not interested in them.
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Yuka Orii

Ceramicware

Studied pottery from Mitio Kobayashi & Yuko in Kasama,Ibaraki 2004 and started her own kiln in Kasama since 2006. To fit the modern diet, she create her own design (shapes and the colors) refering from the old dishes and the plates.And also they are very thin and strong so don't feel much stress for daily use.
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Wakako Senda

Ceramicware

As a potter, I value the blank space of a vessel.
To me, food is like a gift to my family and dear friends. It’s a small, hearty present from me and I think the dishes on which my food is served are a part of the treat. So they should not be too imposing to diminish the food but should be the ones to reflect the feeling of the cook.
I keep this in mind and try to give attention to the presence of my pieces so that both the vessels and food on them look beautiful. I hope to create a piece that would inspire to cook. I wish my pieces to bear a mood of being dignified but never too sharp, with softness hidden inside. I myself hope to be and live like that as a person.
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Yamato Kobayashi

Ceramicware

A vessel which is simple to use in everyday life, is always there at the same place without standing out. It is used to serve food and put away as usual. That is the kind of vessel I aim to create. On the other hand, I also long to create a kind of vessel that could complete itself on its own with its own beauty of appearance. How can I put these contradicting ideas into one piece? I am working with these thoughts every day.
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Hiroy Glass Studio

Glassware

In running a studio, we aim to provide an idea of lifestyle in which people choose and use vessels, at various scenes of home life, in a way they choose their clothes. Daily dining tables do not consist of glassware alone. We wish glass tableware would be chosen and used with joy along with various tableware and cutlery of ceramics, porcelain, lacquerware, metalwork and woodwork. We would like to make proposals that only We can make, such as making suggestion and help for our customers’ tableware selection.
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Yoshitaka Nakaya

Wooden works

From Uzumasa, Kyoto.
Graduated from Ritsumeikan University Graduate School of Science and Engineering.
After working at a shipbuilding machinery company, entered Oak Village Co., Ltd and worked as a manager of manufacturing department of custom made furniture.
2009 Established Komono NAKAYA.
2011 Accepeted for the exhibition, Craft in Action.
Also, has been working for numbers of personal exhibitions and projects exhibitions.
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Sashimono kagu Takahashi

Wooden works

"One Hundred years"
Sasimono is a traditional technique of and also the products of assembling wooden piseces.
We,sasimono-shi (sasimono-craftsman),have responsibility for giving a new life to wood pieces as tools that human can use as long as those woods had lived in the forest.
To carry out our duty, we need to keep pursuing everlasting design,being not affected bythe changing times.
Following the philosophy Sasimono-craftsmen, We advocate “Sasimono-kagu(Sasimono- funiture)”as the new way of Sasimono.
Our goal is to produce beautiful and functional furniture that will be loved for generations and used for at least one hundred years.
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Yuiko Kamiyama

Textiles

I'm a textile designer and a silk screen print artist living in Okayama, Japan.
When I design, I get my inspiration from plants and things familiar in everyday life. Using a technique called silkscreen printing, I make textiles with various patterns.
I also make clothes and interior textile product like curtains with my own textiles.
I try to create things that make everyday life more fun.
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